Some Bodyparts Sunburn More Easily

Published on

Let’s face it. It’s hot! Record breaking temperatures across the world. Don’t you feel sorry for those folks in Europe that are sweltering?

When it’s hot people tend to do one of two things. They either hide in the cool house or they venture to the water. The splashpad at the park, the water park, the local swimming pool and the beach. But hanging out all day in the sun does have it’s issues. Some folks, especially fair-skinned folks like me, tend to burn and burn fast.

splash pad
splash pad

Did you realize that some parts of your body will burn faster than others?

You play volleyball or frisbee or merely lay out in the sun. You undoubtedly will raise your arms. The sun’s reflection from sand, concrete, the water and even your choice of beach towel can reflect those rays and you’ll get sunburned in places you never really thought about. Like your underarms. Because really, how often do your underarms see the light of day?

When men go shirtless, or women are wearing tank tops, cami tops with thin straps, bandeau or bikini tops you’ll find that your underarms (and shoulders and the back of the neck) are truly exposed. When possible sit in the shade.

shade
shade

It’s not just your underarms. Frankly speaking, your swimsuit probably covers much less of you than your normally worn top. This means that the exposed portion of your breasts are now exposed to more sunlight than normal. The same goes with the tops of your ears and the tops of your feet AND if you’re sunbathing on your stomach, then the back of your knees and the bottoms of your feet can get sunburned. That’s painful. You’ll be reminded what you should have done with every single step you take.

Your best bet, aside from never going outside in the summer, (you need vitamin D so do get ‘some’ sunlight exposure) you should be sure to pack and use your sunscreen. Fair-skinned people and young children should use a sunscreen with a higher SPF.

coral
coral

In the past couple of years we’ve learned that sunscreen that leaches from our bodies in the ocean surf is harmful to the growth of coral reefs. You can minimize the use of that sunscreen by wearing a UPF sun-shirt thereby limiting the amount of sunscreen you use. However, there are now brands of sunscreen that don’t contain the harmful ingredients that are shown to harm coral life. Look for these new coral-safe sunscreens and use them.