Never Buy Property Sight Unseen

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You’ve scrimped and saved and you’ve finally got the down-payment for that little piece of land in the countryside. Before you sign those papers or put down that non-refundable down payment be sure that you have taken these things into consideration.

Location
Are all the neighbors houses abandoned and empty? There’s probably a reason for that. If the abandoned home/trailer/rv is on your potential property you’ll most likely find that you are responsible for removing or disposing of it.

abandoned trailer
abandoned trailer
Are the roads maintained? Is there a road? Will you need to hire someone to clear a path to your building site? Price gravel in the area.
gravel road
gravel road
Learn what’s within a few miles of the place, in all directions. You don’t want to be downwind from a hog farm, or next to derelict trailers.

Is there a ready water source? If not, you’ll want to find out the average well depth as drilling can be pricey. Going to depend upon a water catchment system? You’ll want to determine the average rainfall, per month as well as yearly.

red water pump
red water pump

Is the ground too rocky for a garden? Too poor for anything to grow except weeds? Too hot? Too dry?

Do you have an income source? If not, how far is it to your workplace? Is your skill-set needed in this area?

Start small. Many people buy a plot in the countryside with a dream. They might have a plan but haven’t necessarily thought out the particulars of that plan. They bring in goats, chickens, a couple young cows and a pet horse.

goat family
goat family
Combined with a yearning they attempt to grow a garden only to discover that gardening in this soil and zone is different than back home. They run through their resources and are forced to give it up and head back to the city, tails tucked.

Those abandoned trailers/RV’s and little cabins you see in a proposed area all have a similar story to them. There’s a reason the land is cheap.

Do your homework on the land. Never buy land sight unseen. You should walk the property to discover if it’ll work for your needs. You might be expecting mature trees and rolling hills but end up with rocky ravines that overflow their banks in the rainy season flooding the main section of the property. Check out the access, gardening in that zone and in those conditions. Have a detailed plan, energy and health. Don’t go whole hog with your plans, at first. Maybe start a small garden, raise a few chickens and get used to working with your hands and depending upon your skills to get you by. Over time your skills will improve and you can expand your homestead lifestyle by adding a greenhouse, a bigger garden, and more livestock.

Do your homework and start small. Growth can come over time.