Getting Started with Homesteading Even in Town

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Maybe the time isn’t quite right yet but you’ve a deep yearning to dig in the dirt and become more self-sufficient. No worries. You can start learning to homestead even in town!

If you’ve got a backyard you can start homesteading on a smaller scale. Shoot, you can even accomplish a bit of the self-reliant lifestyle on a patio or even a balcony!

Don’t bite off more than you can chew, in other words, start small. A tomato plant in a pot is a start. Container gardening is a thing and many people grow a large variety of vegetables in big pots. You can too.

Tomatoes on the vine
Tomatoes on the vine

If you city allows it you can have backyard chickens. Fresh eggs are wonderful and as an added bonus the chickens will eat all the bugs they can find.

Chicken coop
Chicken coop

If you’ve the space try planting direct into the ground. There’s less watering this way and the ground soaks up and retains some moisture. Add your coffee grounds, your egg shells and vegetable peelings to the ground. It adds back to the soil improving it bit by bit.

Anything you can learn to grow is a step in the right direction. Those fresh tomatoes will show you the difference between store-bought and fresh-picked. You might not even make it inside with all of them as they’re great right out of the garden. Some seasoned gardeners even carry a salt shaker in their pocket so they can eat their pickings right away!

In the event that you have an overabundance of tomatoes.. well that’s when you learn to make fresh salsa… or fresh pasta sauce… or can for later use.

Ingredients to make salsa
Ingredients to make salsa

Fresh tomatoes that are vine-ripened and warmed by the sun are just the best! This holds true for other vegetables as well. Fresh picked squash is far better than store-bought… and peppers, and cukes and okra…

Homesteading isn’t just raising all your food and building barns. It’s a learning process. Anything you can learn that makes you more self-sufficient is a step in the right direction.

You can learn to make soap… toiletries…yogurt, pickles, jams, jellies all from scratch! Homesteading is a learning process.

What would you like to learn how to do next?